FLORAL

Type
Natural raw material
Parts used
Fresh flowers, petals
Extraction method
Steam distillation or solvent extraction

Majestic and characteristic, spicy, green and honeyed, powerful and rich, both floral and fruity scent, that can evoke litchee.

The bedrock of perfumery, roses are inextricably linked to the fragrances we’ve come to know and love. In fact, rose comprises more than 400 known constituents, with a variety of reconstructions across every price point. Its scent is powerful and rich, with floral and fruity facets of contrast: sweet yet spicy, green yet honeyed. Rose is often described as a feminine note with floral, powdery facets.

Production

In what we imagine to be some of the most beautiful regions imaginable, roses are grown en masse throughout parts of France, Turkey, Bulgaria and Morocco (the Daddès Valley). But not all roses make it into our beloved fragrances. Rather, roses are classified into two overarching categories: ornamental roses grown for their aesthetic qualities, and then the coveted fragrant roses that pique perfumers’ interests. Among the 5,000 known botanical varieties of roses, only a mere two are used in perfumery: the Rosa Centifolia and the Rosa Damascena. Rosa Centifolia, a thorn-less flower grown in Grasse, is considered to have a more “delicate” scent, extracted using solvents to obtain an absolute. Akin to anything of interest, this divine floral note is shrouded in secrecy—with its production becoming rather secretive of late. And yet, the fragrant qualities of Centifolia are so lovely that prestige perfume houses continue to use it. On the other hand, Rosa Damascena (or Damascus rose)—produced in Turkey and Bulgaria—is the only known rose to exist as an essence. And what’s more: it’s thought to be among the richest, most velvety essences available. This essence is captured through a process of distillation, whereby the flowers are handpicked at dawn and quickly processed to avoid fermentation.
Photo by courtesy of Robertet.
Photo by courtesy of Robertet.
Iconic perfume
Chloé
CHLOÉ EAU DE PARFUM (2008)

The list of perfumes that could be mentioned as being iconic of the rose is quite long: Rose Jacqueminot by Coty, Nahéma by Guerlain, Paris by Yves Saint Laurent, Trésor by Lancôme…, but Chloé, created in 2008, offered a revival to the rose, by proposing a natural, modern and feminine illustration. The rose leans on the peony in the top, drawing the moisture of a morning dew, and on the lychee for a juicy and attractive touch. It holds its freshness and lightness right to the base, where it embraces an ambery and musky cedar.

History

Soft, silky and awe-inspiringly lovely… it’s no wonder roses are the epitome of romance and passion. The existence of roses—and our subsequent fascination with them—spans more than three millennia. Throughout time, roses have been mixed in countless skincare products, distilled into a myriad of scents and olfactory concoctions, and doted on for their aesthetic qualities. The floors of Babylonian palaces are said to have been covered in soft rose petals. In Antiquity, roses were a staple of lavish banquets: used to perfume water, fine wines and jams. And in Morocco, Arabs and Berbers enjoyed distilling roses and rose by-products as early as the first century BC.
Photo by courtesy of Robertet.
Photo by courtesy of Robertet.

Did you know

The name “Rosa Centifolia,” is inspired by the flowers’ abundance of petals (cent feuilles).
The olfactory sophistication of roses is rather impressive: its complex chemistry makes it inimitable, it’s composed of no less than 400 components, some of which are found in traces, but, nevertheless, play a decisive role in shaping its divine scent. The rose itself is the symbol of love (the white rose stands for purity; the red rose for passion). In addition to its palpable importance in perfumery, essential oil of Rosa centifolia has many therapeutic applications. It is a general tonic, and it helps restore balance to mind and body by removing inhibitions to combat anxiety. In cosmetology, it is strongly advised to use it to regenerate dry or flaky skin.
Photo by courtesy of Robertet.

Some fragrances related to the ingredient

FLORAL
CHYPRE / CITRUS
Tom Ford | Private Blend Jardin Noir

CAFÉ ROSE

FLORAL
Ex Nihilo | Collection Initiale

ROSE HUBRIS

FLORAL
FLORAL
Juicy Couture | Regal

ROYAL ROSE

FLORAL
Burberry | Signatures

TUDOR ROSE

FLORAL
FLORAL
Paris Hilton

ROSÉ RUSH

FLORAL
O Boticário

ALCHEMISTS ROSE

FLORAL / CITRUS
L'Occitane | 86 Champs Collection

FIGUIER & ROSE

FLORAL / CITRUS
Elie Saab | Essences

ESSENCE Nº 1 ROSE

FLORAL
Shay & Blue

AMBER ROSE

FLORAL
Armani Privé | Les Eaux

ROSE ALEXANDRIE

FLORAL / CITRUS
L'Occitane | 86 Champs Collection

ROSE SAFRAN

FLORAL
FLORAL
FLORAL
Mona di Orio | Alinea

ROSE CONCRETE

FLORAL
Fragonard

ROSE DE MAI

FLORAL

Musk

Bergamot

Sandalwood

Patchouli

Amber

Vanilla

Jasmine

Cedarwood

Rose

Mandarin

Vetiver

Lemon

Tonka Bean

Iris / Orris

Orange Blossom

Cardamom

Pink Pepper

Lavender

Grapefruit

Woody Notes

The perfumes that captivate you and the ingredients that brings them to life shape your olfactory profile. Here you can develop it. And because scents reveal your essence, you'll receive recommendations that fit your olfactory personality like a glove.

Sign up to save your searches, findings and our recommendations.